National Police Misconduct Reporting Project

Albuquerque Police: There is a Pattern of Excessive Force

CNN:

Albuquerque, New Mexico, police officers killed a 19-year-old as he “lay motionless on his back,” an unarmed drugstore robber who was walking away from officers and a 25-year-old veteran suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder who threatened to shoot himself in the head.

So says the U.S. Justice Department, which on Thursday issued a report lambasting the Albuquerque Police Department for a longstanding history of police brutality and unnecessary deadly force….

“For too long, Albuquerque officers have faced little scrutiny from their superiors in carrying out this fundamental responsibility,” the report says. “Despite the efforts of many committed individuals, external oversight is broken and has allowed the department to remain unaccountable to the communities it serves.”

To conduct its review, the Justice Department “reviewed thousands of pages of documents, including written policies and procedures, internal reports, data, video footage, and investigative files,” the report says. It also interviewed command staff, rank-and-file officers and community members, and held four community meetings where residents “provided their accounts of encounters with officers.”

Deputy Accidently Shoots Woman During Raid

From Buckeye Country 105.com:

A Ross County law enforcement official is on paid leave after firing a shot that eventually killed a woman during a drug raid.

Members of the U.S. 23 Task Force raided a known drug house along U.S. 23 in southern Ross County late Wednesday night. As soon as they got inside, they found a woman with a head wound on the couch in the living room.

“It was discovered later that a bullet had accidentally discharged from outside the door of the trailer and went through the outside wall of the trailer and into the living room,” said Ross County Sheriff George Lavender.

The bullet struck Krystal Barrows in the head. She was flown to OSU Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, but she died from her wounds….

The sheriff says he was outside the home at the time of the raid and never heard a shot go off. He thinks it probably happened at the same time a flash-bang grenade was used as agents entered the home. Those devices are used to distract and confuse suspects.

And for the Nth time, those grenades also confuse the police–and that too often endangers people unnecessarily.

More here.

Groups Protest Dallas Police Dept

From the Dallas Morning News:

The families of several men killed or wounded by Dallas police officers lambasted the department Thursday for what they said was a pattern of excessive force, civil rights violations and police brutality under color of law.

The newly formed Mothers Against Police Brutality held a news conference at City Hall where they called for a U.S. Justice Department investigation of the Dallas Police Department’s deadly force practices.

“It is not a black problem,” said Collette Flanagan, whose son Clinton Allen was fatally shot this year by a Dallas police officer. “It is not a Hispanic problem. It’s not a poor people’s problem. It is our problem” ….

Late Thursday, Police Chief David Brown issued a statement saying that he shared many of the group’s concerns.

“I look forward to working with this group, and moving forward towards positive changes for our department,” Brown said.

Police Shooting in New Mexico

More here.  I don’t presume to know what the woman was thinking.  She made bad choices and broke some laws.  But her actions do not make any police response reasonable.  Good police respond professionally to unreasonable people in the community.

The police officer who fired at the van was probably aiming for the rear tires.  Still, under the circumstances, seems like an unjustified use of deadly force.  An impartial review is needed.

Dallas Police Shoot Mentally Ill Man

From Fox News:

Surveillance video showing a Dallas police officer shooting a mentally ill man standing still about 20 feet away contradicts the assertion of an officer that the man threatened his safety by lunging at him with a knife.

Bobby Gerald Bennett remains hospitalized after being shot in the stomach Monday. The officer who shot him, Cardan Spencer, is on indefinite administrative leave pending a criminal investigation after a neighbor released surveillance video that captured the incident.

 

 

 

Eugene Mallory

 

Los Angeles Sheriff Deputies burst into Eugene Mallory’s home expecting to find a meth lab, but turns out there was no meth.

Police say that the 80-year-old Mallory, who was in bed, reached for one of his handguns.  That’s when the police shot him six times, killing him.

Mallory’s wife is now bringing a wrongful death lawsuit against the police department.

Where did the police get the idea that there might be a meth lab in this home?  According to the news account, an officer had been in the area and could smell the types of chemicals that are used to make meth.   Hmm.   Perhaps enough to conduct further investigation–watching the premises, for example.   Shouldn’t be enough for raiding someone’s home.

More here.

Questions About a Police Shooting in New York’s Times Square

From the New York Times:

The shooting on Saturday night immediately raised questions about the police’s use of deadly force, especially in a crowded area where bystanders were in the line of fire. On Sunday, police officials, including the commissioner, Raymond W. Kelly, refused to say if the shooting appeared justified, saying that the circumstances were being investigated.

Department guidelines say officers may not fire their weapons unless they believe they or other people are in imminent danger of death or serious injury, or if doing so will “unnecessarily endanger innocent persons.” Nonetheless, the courts and the Police Department generally give officers great leeway in deciding when to fire their weapons….

The two officers were placed on administrative duty pending the department’s internal investigation, as officers typically are after a shooting. The review process can result in retraining for the officer or more serious disciplinary action, including the rarely employed option of dismissal from the force. (That occurred for one officer after the 2006 killing of Sean Bell, who was unarmed. Three others were forced to resign; one was exonerated in a departmental hearing.)

The Monroe Isadore Case

From the Washington Post:

When the time came to move 107-year-old Monroe Isadore to a new home, police say he resisted and barricaded himself inside. Authorities tried using a camera to monitor him, along with negotiating tactics, and finally gas to get him to come out.

None of it worked.

So, a SWAT team went inside and was greeted by gunfire, authorities say. The team fired back, and Isadore died.

The weekend confrontation raised a flurry of questions Monday as residents struggled to make sense of how someone known as a pleasant, churchgoing man who was hard of hearing and sometimes carried a cane had died in an explosive confrontation. Did authorities know how old he was? Did they follow proper procedure? Could they have done anything differently?

“It’s just a big puzzle,” said Ivory Perry, who has known Isadore for decades.