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National Police Misconduct Reporting Project

Worst of the Month — January 2016

So for January, it was the case from Suffolk County, New York, involving now former police officer, Scott Greene.  He was convicted of repeated instances of theft.

According to the evidence introduced at his criminal trial, Greene would target Hispanic drivers, pull them over, order them to surrender their wallets, or invent a reason to search their vehicles and then steal cash located inside.  By stealing from persons he thought were illegal immigrants, Greene thought his victims would not come forward to file any complaint.  And he would enrich himself by using his police powers.  Prosecutor Tom Spota called Greene a “thief with a badge” and says he will be seeking the maximum possible prison sentence–about four years.

Alas, there are problems in the Suffolk department even beyond Greene.  The recently departed chief, James Burke, has been indicted for abusing a suspect and then coercing his subordinate officers to cover up his crime.  Local community activists say the department is so corrupt that they want a federal takeover.  Stay tuned about that.

Worst of the Month — December 2015

So for December we have selected the shooting death of Andrew Thomas in Paradise, California.  According to news reports, here’s what happened:  Thomas was seen leaving the parking lot of a bar and his vehicle didn’t have its lights on — even though it was late at night.  Officer Patrick Feaster suspected the driver might be intoxicated and so pursued Thomas to pull him over and investigate further.

No problem so far.  We want police to be alert for impaired drivers who endanger other people.

Next, Thomas did not pull over after Feaster was behind him with his police lights flashing.

Moments later, Thomas’s SUV crashed and his wife was ejected from the vehicle.  She died.

Next, things get even worse.  Officer Feaster is seen on dash-cam video walking toward the crashed SUV.  The video shows Thomas trying to climb out of the overturned SUV.  Feaster draws his sidearm and shoots Thomas in the neck and he falls back into his SUV.

After the shooting, Officer Feaster gets on his radio to report that the driver is refusing his commands to get out of the vehicle.  He does not mention that he shot the driver.  Feaster also reports that a injured woman is unresponsive, but the video shows that he is not checking on her condition or rendering aid.

Other police and responders get to the scene, but ten minutes go by before Feaster says he fired his weapon.  It is very unclear what could be the justification for shooting a man after a vehicle crash in these circumstances.  Officer Feaster says he was not threatened, but that his gun went off accidentally.

On a police body camera, Feaster is heard telling the watch commander that his gun went off, but he didn’t think the driver was hit because he wasn’t aiming his weapon in the driver’s direction.  Thomas initially survived the shot to his neck, but was paralyzed.  He died weeks later.

Despite community outrage, the local prosecutor, Mike Ramsey, declined to file any criminal charges against Officer Feaster because he said he lacked sufficient evidence to prove a crime in court.  That’s very odd.  Prosecutors would typically be relieved to know that the incident was captured on videotape.

View the video for yourself here:

 

 

Happy Holidays from NPMRP!

I’d like to personally thank all of our readers for making this another great year. NPMRP is an important public information project and the more people know about what is going on in their police departments the more impetus for change there will be.

Our staff is wrapping up for the holidays to spend time with our families so our newsfeed will be dark for the remainder of 2015. That said, we’ll be back up and running again on January 4, 2016 with all of the reports over our break to start the new year.

Keep submitting tips and stories here on the website and we will get to them when we return. We wish you and yours safe and happy holidays. We’ll see you in 2016!

 

Worst of the Month — October

So for the month of October, we’ve selected the incident from Owasso, Oklahoma.  Michael Denton was charged with excessive force for beating a motorist with the butt of a shotgun.

The reason why this is arguably the worst case from last month is because this is the very same officer who was fired for excessive force for elbowing an inmate in the face.  An arbitrator later reversed his dismissal and in February Denton was awarded $280,000 in back-pay.

Not just a problem officer here.  The system for getting rid of problem officers seems broken.  Will Denton be reinstated again?  Stay tuned.

A Housekeeping Note

The NPMRP stream and the daily recaps will be inactive starting this afternoon through the end of the week. If any national stories break we will have them for you, but hardware and connectivity issues currently impede timely collection and output for our newsfeed. We will be back to normal production Monday morning.

We are sorry for this temporary disruption.

Worst of the Month — September

So for September we have chosen the Chicago Police Department, particularly, the officers who were responsible for arresting George Roberts.

CBS Chicago reports on a lawsuit filed by Roberts against the Chicago Police Department.  According to Roberts, he was falsely arrested and roughed up by police following a traffic stop.  Here’s the thing: Roberts investigates police misconduct for the Independent Police Review Authority.  And it was when the police discovered that fact that the abuse of power began.  Mysteriously, several police cameras on the scene were turned off:

It is against policy in both Chicago and Illinois for a police officer to turn off his dashboard camera, CBS Chicago reports.

Vehicles belonging to two other officers on the scene were equipped with audio recording devices, though no audio of the encounter was saved, according to the lawsuit.

Roberts said in the lawsuit, which was filed on Sept. 15, that the camera was shut off after officers realized he worked for the Independent Police Review Authority — or IPRA — the agency responsible for investigating police misconduct.

Roberts said he was initially stopped for a minor traffic violation, but was then pushed in the back by one of the officers and forced to the ground. He said in the lawsuit that an officer shouted, “Don’t make me [expletive] shoot you.”

But “when the (officers) turned off the dash camera, things got worse,” his attorneys write in the lawsuit.

Roberts, who was handcuffed and placed in the back of a police vehicle, complained that the handcuffs were too tight, according to the lawsuit. The 6-foot-3, 315 pound man says that, instead, it would have have been appropriate for officers to use multiple handcuffs strung together for someone of his size.

He says in the lawsuit that one of the officers responded to his complaints: “What are you going to tell me next, you can’t breathe?” — an apparent reference to Eric Garner, a New York City man who died in 2014 as a result of a police choke hold.

Roberts also says he was told “that’s your fault,” when he pointed out that his weight made the single set of handcuffs painful.

Read the whole thing.  Roberts was suspended from his job while charges were pending.  Following his acquittal, he returned to work.

Worst of the Month — August 2015

So for August it was the case of Officer Kevin McGowan.  According to news reports, Patrick D’Labik, age 18, admits to running away from the police.  He said he ran because he had some marijuana in his pocket and did not want to go to jail.  Officer McGowan caught up with D’Labik in a convenience store and the encounter was caught on the store’s surveillance tape (video at the link above).  D’Labik has his hands raised in surrender and is in the process of getting on the floor when McGowan kicks him in the face.

When police commanders saw the surveillance tape, they concluded it was unnecessary, excessive force and fired McGowan.

Wait, McGowan is now back on patrol because the city’s Civil Service Board reinstated him.

Worst of the Month — July

For July, it was the case from Akron, Ohio.  Officer Eric Paull worked as a sergeant for the Akron Police Department.  He also taught a course on criminal justice at the University of Akron.  One of his students was a single mom.  According to news reports, the woman (name withheld) says they started a romantic relationship.  But after a year or so, that relationship turned ugly and violent.  After he beat her up on a Thanksgiving holiday, Paull told her that he was legally “untouchable.”

She believed him–so she did not file a complaint right away.  Instead, she just tried to avoid him.  But Paull stalked her and her boyfriends, using police databases to discover addresses, phone numbers, and vehicle information.  Paull would also text pictures of himself holding his gun.  There were threats to kill the woman and her boyfriend.  The woman did lodge complaints with the police and would later obtain a protective order, but the police department seemed indifferent.  Paull would not stop.

Finally, after months of harassment, Paull was charged with stalking, aggravated menacing, felonious assault, and burglary, among other charges.  His trial is expected to begin in a few weeks.

Paul Hlynsky, the police union leader, says he will try to have Paull back on the police force if he can avoid a felony conviction.

Worst of the Month — June

So the worst case for June goes to the police department in Carrollton, Kentucky.

Adam Horine was a homeless person who arrested for some petty offense.  He then appeared before Judge Elizabeth Chandler.  Horine wanted to represent himself in the case and he gave the judge some rambling answers to her questions.  Horine indicated that he had problems and did not seem angry when the judge ordered that he be sent to a hospital for a mental health evaluation.

This is when things took a bizzare turn.  Instead of following the judge’s order, the local police chief, Michael Willhoite, had one of his deputies put Horine, against his wishes, on a 28 hour bus ride to Florida.  No one accompanied Horine on the bus and no one was expected to meet him when the bus trip ended in Florida.  The idea seemed to be to push their problem prisoner on someone else.  One wonders whether this was the first time that this “police technique” was used.

Even though the police put the mentally distressed Horine on the bus, they would later charge Horine with a new crime, “escape from custody.”

 

 

Worst of the Month — May 2015

So the worst case for May was the death of Matthew Ajibade.  Ajibade’s girlfriend called the police because he was having a bipolar episode.  Georgia deputies arrested Ajibade but then took him to the jail instead of a hospital.  At the jail, he was placed in a restraint chair.  Deputies reportedly fired stun guns at him while he was restrained in the chair and then left him unattended in an isolation cell.  Ajibade, 22, died and the coroner now says it was homicide.  Nine deputies were fired over the incident and a criminal investigation is on-going.

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Note: We were so busy in early May following the criminal charges leveled at the 6 Baltimore police officers that we neglected to do a “Worst of the Month” for April.   It was the death of Freddie Gray.