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National Police Misconduct Reporting Project

Worst of the Month — July

For July, it was the case from Akron, Ohio.  Officer Eric Paull worked as a sergeant for the Akron Police Department.  He also taught a course on criminal justice at the University of Akron.  One of his students was a single mom.  According to news reports, the woman (name withheld) says they started a romantic relationship.  But after a year or so, that relationship turned ugly and violent.  After he beat her up on a Thanksgiving holiday, Paull told her that he was legally “untouchable.”

She believed him–so she did not file a complaint right away.  Instead, she just tried to avoid him.  But Paull stalked her and her boyfriends, using police databases to discover addresses, phone numbers, and vehicle information.  Paull would also text pictures of himself holding his gun.  There were threats to kill the woman and her boyfriend.  The woman did lodge complaints with the police and would later obtain a protective order, but the police department seemed indifferent.  Paull would not stop.

Finally, after months of harassment, Paull was charged with stalking, aggravated menacing, felonious assault, and burglary, among other charges.  His trial is expected to begin in a few weeks.

Paul Hlynsky, the police union leader, says he will try to have Paull back on the police force if he can avoid a felony conviction.

Worst of the Month — June

So the worst case for June goes to the police department in Carrollton, Kentucky.

Adam Horine was a homeless person who arrested for some petty offense.  He then appeared before Judge Elizabeth Chandler.  Horine wanted to represent himself in the case and he gave the judge some rambling answers to her questions.  Horine indicated that he had problems and did not seem angry when the judge ordered that he be sent to a hospital for a mental health evaluation.

This is when things took a bizzare turn.  Instead of following the judge’s order, the local police chief, Michael Willhoite, had one of his deputies put Horine, against his wishes, on a 28 hour bus ride to Florida.  No one accompanied Horine on the bus and no one was expected to meet him when the bus trip ended in Florida.  The idea seemed to be to push their problem prisoner on someone else.  One wonders whether this was the first time that this “police technique” was used.

Even though the police put the mentally distressed Horine on the bus, they would later charge Horine with a new crime, “escape from custody.”

 

 

Worst of the Month — May 2015

So the worst case for May was the death of Matthew Ajibade.  Ajibade’s girlfriend called the police because he was having a bipolar episode.  Georgia deputies arrested Ajibade but then took him to the jail instead of a hospital.  At the jail, he was placed in a restraint chair.  Deputies reportedly fired stun guns at him while he was restrained in the chair and then left him unattended in an isolation cell.  Ajibade, 22, died and the coroner now says it was homicide.  Nine deputies were fired over the incident and a criminal investigation is on-going.

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Note: We were so busy in early May following the criminal charges leveled at the 6 Baltimore police officers that we neglected to do a “Worst of the Month” for April.   It was the death of Freddie Gray.

Three Year Mark For PoliceMisconduct.net

So today marks our three year anniversary here at PoliceMisconduct.net!  One of our prime objectives has been to draw more attention to the problem of police misconduct across the country.  Long time readers must be amazed (as are we!) at the attention this subject has been receiving the past few months.  The President himself has acknowledged the “slow-rolling” crisis has been on-going for many years and also that some “soul searching” is in order.   Yes, it’s long overdue.  Better late than never.

The victims of police misconduct are too often without a voice and the extent of the problem was (is) unknown because few seemed interested enough to study it.  We at Cato thought it important to lend some institutional support to this critical area.  And, increasingly, the media (and others) have found this site to be a valuable resource.  Over the past year, we’ve been cited by the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, the Economist, ABC News, the Atlantic, and Frontline.  If the first step toward addressing a problem is recognizing that a problem exists, then we’re there.

Of course, there’s much more to do.  Just wanted to mark this occasion and provide our friends with an update on our work.  One easy way you can help us is by spreading the word by taking a moment to blast a note to all your contacts via twitter and Facebook.  Thanks for your consideration and support!

NewsFeed Break

Please know there will be a one-day break in the NewsFeed. We will resume tracking and posting Tuesday, April 21, 2015.

As always, we appreciate it when readers use our submissions page to send us stories they find from around the country.

Worst of the Month — March

For March, it has to be the conspiracy to frame an innocent man, Douglas Dendinger, in Bogalusa, Louisiana.

Mr. Dendinger agreed to take on the task of a “process server.”  That is, he would hand-deliver legal papers to a person who has been sued–putting that person on notice about the legal action.  In this instance, Mr. Dendinger was to serve papers upon a former police officer, Chad Cassard, who was being sued for police brutality.  Mr. Dendinger found Mr. Cassard as he was leaving the local courthouse and made the delivery.  At that moment, Mr. Cassard was in the company of several police officers and prosecutors.  These people became hostile and furious with Mr. Dendinger over what this lawsuit would mean for their friend/colleague.

Then the story takes a bizarre and disturbing turn.  Later that day, the police arrive at Mr. Dendinger’s home and place him under arrest on several charges, including two felonies (1) obstruction of justice and (2) witness intimidation.   Mr. Cassard and a few of his cohorts claimed that Mr. Dendinger had served the papers in a violent fashion.  Mr. Dendinger was in very serious legal trouble.  He was looking at many years in prison.

Fortunately, a cell phone video of the “incident” emerged.  Turns out, Mr. Dendinger did nothing wrong.  All he did was peacefully hand-deliver an envelope to Mr. Cassard.  The charges were then dropped.

But we now know that local police and prosecutors leveled false accusations about what happened that day.   Had the case proceeded to trial, it would have been Mr. Dendinger’s word against several witnesses with law enforcement backgrounds.  A jury would have been hard pressed to disbelieve several witnesses who claimed to see the same thing.  A miscarriage of justice was narrowly averted.

The cell phone video exposes an outrageous criminal conspiracy by officials in Bogalusa.  More here.

Worst of the Month — January 2015

The worst police misconduct for January comes from Miramar, Florida. The misconduct took place in the 1980s, but it took some time for it to be exposed.  A federal appeals court recently upheld a $7,000,000 judgment against two now-former officers

In 1983, the officers coerced a mentally challenged 15-year-old boy, Anthony Caravella, to confess to rape and murder. Furthermore, they withheld exculpatory evidence in his case. The victim served 26 years before being exonerated by DNA evidence in 2009.

From the Florida Sun-Sentinel:

Caravella was arrested by Mantesta and Pierson on Dec. 28, 1983, on a juvenile case that alleged he stole a bicycle and didn’t show up for court.

Over the next week, while in juvenile custody, Caravella gave a series of statements to the officers that culminated in him confessing to the murder.

Heyer said Caravella trusted Mantesta and the officers, who spent hours alone with him, fed him information about the crime scene and got him to repeat it back to them.

Caravella and his childhood friend, Dawn Simone Herron, testified in the 2013 civil trial that the officers coerced Caravella into falsely incriminating himself by telling him that if he gave a statement they would free the 16-year-old girl who was with him when he was arrested.

After that “police work,” prosecutors actually sought the death penalty, but the jury opted for a life sentence.

The man who was actually responsible for the rape and murder remained free, potentially endangering other members of the community.  The man implicated by the DNA analysis died in 2010 and never faced justice for this crime.

Welcome Jonathan Blanks

I have a new research associate, Jonathan Blanks, who will be working with me on criminal justice issues, particularly on police misconduct matters.  Jon’s primary responsibilities will include tweeting the misconduct incidents, preparing the Daily Recaps, and searching for more misconduct stories (because I know I fall short of finding them all).

By way of introduction, Jon graduated from Indiana University with a BA in political science.  He has been working here at the Cato Institute since 2007 and he has published articles all over the place–including in the Washington PostThe New RepublicDenver Post, Chicago TribuneCapital Playbook (New York), ReasonLibertarianism.orgRare.us, and the Indianapolis Star.

In 2015, we hope to make this web site even better!

 

 

Worst of the Month – December 2014

It goes to the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department. Seven now-former deputies conspired to hide a career criminal from the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The FBI was investigating allegations of abuse and poor conditions in the L.A. County Jail, and the inmate in question was apparently willing to testify against the sheriff’s department. To protect themselves, the deputies effectively kidnapped the prisoner to obstruct the federal investigation. According to the news report, the prisoner’s “name was changed, his records jacket was hidden and computer records were altered to make it appear that [he] had been released from LASD custody.”  The last of the former deputies was sentenced to 18 months in prison for his role in the cover-up in December. The other six former deputies involved were also convicted and sentenced.